Ama e Cambia il Mondo
Ama e Cambia il Mondo
poniesart:

 im like the dopest dope you've ever smoked 
a.k.a no time or energy to actually make a full piece so here’s a 40 min doodle

((quote above is from One Minute by Krewella))

poniesart:

 im like the dopest dope you've ever smoked 

a.k.a no time or energy to actually make a full piece so here’s a 40 min doodle

((quote above is from One Minute by Krewella))

mrjakeparker:

Inktober is upon us! Less than a week away, and people ALL over the world are committing to the challenge! Go to www.mrjakeparker.com/inktober for more info. #inktober
Here’s the Inktober rules:
1) Make a drawing in ink (you can do a pencil under-drawing if you want).
2) Post it on your blog (or tumblr, instagram, twitter, facebook, flickr, Pinterest or just pin it on your wall.)
3) Hashtag it with #inktober
4) Repeat
Note: you can do it daily, or go the half-marathon route and post every other day, or just do the 5K and post once a week. What ever you decide, just be consistent with it. INKtober is about growing and improving and forming positive habits, so the more you’re consistent the better.

mrjakeparker:

Inktober is upon us! Less than a week away, and people ALL over the world are committing to the challenge! Go to www.mrjakeparker.com/inktober for more info. #inktober

Here’s the Inktober rules:

1) Make a drawing in ink (you can do a pencil under-drawing if you want).

2) Post it on your blog (or tumblr, instagram, twitter, facebook, flickr, Pinterest or just pin it on your wall.)

3) Hashtag it with #inktober

4) Repeat

Note: you can do it daily, or go the half-marathon route and post every other day, or just do the 5K and post once a week. What ever you decide, just be consistent with it. INKtober is about growing and improving and forming positive habits, so the more you’re consistent the better.

How do I read drill?
Anonimo

bandgeeksknowit:

Yeah this’ll be a nice before-bed ask.

So basically, drill is just a sheet of graph paper that tells the band, who is assigned a number (sometimes a letter paired with a number, the letter often varying on which section you’re in; i.e., trumpet players will be T-1, T-2, T-3, etc), where they have to be on the field in a certain number of counts.  On the sheet, it should tell you the amount of counts you have and the measures corresponding from the music to the specific sets.  This information is usually in the right or left-hand upper corner.

To get into formation, the band members take the designated amount of counts to get into the form on that sheet; so, the counts aren’t telling you how to get from the page that they’re on to the next one, they’re telling you how to get into that form from the one on the last page.  While you’re moving into form, you should be taking EVEN STEP SIZE, so it’s up to you to determine how big or how small your steps should be based on the distances you have to go, the amount of counts you have, and the tempo.

You will always be facing front unless told otherwise, so you should be prepared for back marching, obliques, and slides (or crabs, if you’re a percussionist).

When you are facing the drum major’s platform and reading the drill, since the director’s viewpoint is usually at the BOTTOM of the page, the image is mirrored. Meaning, if while you are facing the front it looks like you are on the 45 to the left of the 50, you are actually on the 45 to the right of the 50.  To quickly conquer this confusion, it helps to either turn the drill sheet upside down or turn around to face backfield.  

I would attach more pictures, but Tumblr is stupid and won’t let me, so that’s the gist of it.  If you have any more specific questions, let me know.

Im a Percussionist so can you explain this AY YO FLUTES thing to me ?

bandgeeksknowit:

when there’s something weird

in your neighborhood

who you gonna call

HEY YO FLUTES

jonpertwee:

Let’s do a tag game where we don’t use words, just commonly put together letters:

  • co
  • ie
  • ta
  • po
  • sc
  • si
  • bl
  • mu

HAVE A RADICAL LIZARD YO

HAVE A RADICAL LIZARD YO

catholicnun:

Halloween costume idea: dress up as your URL

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

selfies I never uploaded

iconicgloryy:

Space Girl Bath Bomb from a few months ago. I used two of them for the jacuzzi.